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Harburn Village Hall - Craft Fair Archive 2011


DIDN'T FANCY IT BUT...........
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We are very grateful to Iain McCorquodale for his very full and well-illustrated report on the 2011 CRAFT FAIR. The Harburn annual Craft fair on the 19 th of November was a cornucopia of talent, hard work, dedication and ideas. Reader, I’ll be brutally honest, I went along for some home baking, which I intended to savour whilst my wife browsed the various stalls looking for Xmas treasure with my kids trudging a dutiful 3 paces behind. Instead, I ended up with Journalist duties (which let’s be frank are obviously not my strong point). However I did agree to do it, so I went about it with vigour. What came through loud and clear was how emotionally involving the craft process was to so many of the contributors. This was certainly clear when chatting to Ray Kew of Kew Kottage Krafts. The level of passion for her subject matter was obvious and engaging.
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The other standout was that craft is a family affair, with at least two groups of stalls related in some form or other. For example, Frank Whittle (with the stall manned by his wife Sue) and their daughter Allana represented Funkrase Crafts (intricate bead jewellery) and In Your Dreams (colourful dream catchers). Their summary of the qualities of a craft lover was “patience”, and I can understand that from the detail on display.

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The other family connection I encountered was mother and daughter Linda Brown and Susan Ann Howie who represent Kids’n’Things and their varied fabric creations and Calder Crafts and their patchwork quilts. Susan told me she had being doing the fair “forever”, which seemed to be another common thread in the hall. Liz Steele told me she had been coming with her beaded and stitched gems for 7 or 8 years. The fine soaps on the Lorimars Soaps table certainly play to environmental theme with nothing “nasty” in them however manage to achieve that whilst retaining some amazing shapes and colours. Many moons ago I spent some time with Jenny Tuffs, and it was an absolute pleasure to see her after such a long time. Her work has lost none of its colour and vibrancy since I last saw her. Now, one thing I didn’t suspect when I entered the hall was that two of my immediate neighbours were closet craft people, so it was a pleasure to see Hazel selling her son’s “Delightful Chocolates”, and Irene selling her keenly priced gifts for kids.
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Given the rural setting it was nice to see a couple of stalls devoted to showing off what can be achieved with wood. Thistle Woodcraft is the passion of Derek Thomson, which he turned to (pardon the pun) when he retired as Colinton Postmaster, and on Pete’s Woodturning stand, Pete’s obvious charisma shone through in his various creations. I’ll forgive him for trying to sell my son drumsticks ! The last two stalls to mention acted like best friends, yet explained they’d only met at the last craft fair they attended, a fine example of how a shared interest brings people together. Pauline’s one-off Jewellery items under the banner of “Something Different” and Helen’s lovely ceramics with a seasonal theme certainly showed originality. However as I said, I only went along to get a cake. Good news is that I got the cake, but only after 2 bacon rolls laid the foundation.
Thanks Juliet Boulting and the SWRI

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